October 21 GitHub post-incident analysis

Last week, GitHub experienced an incident that resulted in degraded service for 24 hours and 11 minutes. While portions of our platform were not affected by this incident, multiple internal systems were affected which resulted in our displaying of information that was out of date and inconsistent. Ultimately, no user data was lost; however manual reconciliation for a few seconds of database writes is still in progress. For the majority of the incident, GitHub was also unable to serve webhook events or build and publish GitHub Pages sites. All of us at GitHub would like to sincerely apologize for the impact this caused to each and every one of you. We’re aware of the trust you place in GitHub and take pride in building resilient systems that enable our platform to remain highly available. With this incident, we failed you, and we are deeply sorry. While we cannot undo the problems that were created by GitHub’s platform being unusable for an extended period of time, we can explain the events that led to this incident, the lessons we’ve learned, and the steps we’re taking as a company to better ensure this doesn’t happen again. The majority of user-facing GitHub services are run within our own data center facilities. The data center topology is designed to provide a robust and expandable edge network that operates in front of several regional data centers that power our compute and storage workloads. Despite the layers of redundancy built into the physical and logical components in this design, it is still possible that sites will be unable to communicate with each other for some amount of time.

Source: github

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